Deer Resistant Plants

Wildlife Damage Control already offers an adobe acrobat file listing the relative resistance of ornamental bushes to deer.Deer Resistant Bushes Click Ornamental Bushes

We would like your information on other plants.

Here is a list of plants we have heard were resistant to deer (no guarantee is given regarding the truthfulness of this information). Remember that plant resistance is also tied to the relative density of deer in your area. If deer are hungry, and there is little preferred food. They will eat what they don't like. Sort of like if you don't like spinach, but you are starving, you will eat spinach.

We would love to get your feedback e-mail us at admin@wildlifedamagecontrol.com

Astilbe

Cransebill Geranium

Epimedium

Foxglove

Lamium

Lamb's Ears

Monkshood

Peonies

Pulmonaria (we received one e-mail stating that the deer chowed these plants) 1/17/04

Silvery aremesia

Solomon's Seal

Source: Woman's World 6-15-99 p.39.

For More Deer Damage Control Information click Deer Damage Control

Stephen Vantassel is a Certified Wildlife Control Professional. He is a nationally known writer including having been an assistant editor for Wildlife Control Technology magazine, author of numerous ADC articles as well as The Wildlife Removal Handbook rev.ed and the Wildlife Damage Inspection Handbook rev. ed. Mr. Vantassel is also a vocal critic of the growing animal rights movement. He has exposed the fallacies and deceptions of the animal rights protest industry through debate, lecture and publication.

1/17/04

Disclaimer: WDC seeks to provide accurate, effective and responsible information on resolving human/wildlife conflicts. We welcome suggestions, criticisms to help us achieve this goal. The information provided is for informational purposes only and users of the information use it at their own risk. The reader must consult state/federal officials to determine the legality of any technique in the reader's locale. Some techniques are dangerous to the user and to others. WDC encourages readers to obtain appropriate training (see our informational literature at our Store ), and understand that proper animal damage control involves patience, understanding that not every technique/method works for every situation or even 100% of the time. Your use of this information is governed by this understanding. We welcome potential users of the information and photos to simply ask for permission via e-mail. Finally, WDC welcomes e-mail but understand that all e-mails become property of Wildlife Damage Control.